Transcripts of some old letters.

1.    From Frederick Corfield to his cousin Thomas John Tresidder Corfield, written on Wednesday, 24th September 1851.

2.    From Thomas John Tresidder Corfield to his sons Thomas and Richard, written on Friday, July 6th 1855.

3.    From Mary Corfield to her brother Thomas, written on Friday, February 11th 1859.

4.    From Mary Corfield to her brother Thomas, written on Friday, September 23rd 1859.

5.    From Mary Corfield to her brother Thomas, undated but probably written in 1859.

6.    From Thomas John Tresidder Corfield to his sons Thomas and Richard, written on Tuesday, December 27th 1859.

7.    From Thomas John Tresidder Corfield  to his son Tom, written on Thursday, October 9th 1862.

8.    From Thomas John Tresidder Corfield to his son Thomas, written on Sunday, October 12th 1862.

9.    From Richard Corfield  to his brother Thomas written on Tuesday, October 14th 1862.

10.    From Richard Corfield  to his brother Thomas written on Saturday, October 18th 1862.

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Letter from Frederick Corfield 1821-1883 to his cousin Thomas John Tresidder Corfield 1816-1887.

Ireland
Templecrone Rectory
Dungloe
Donegal
September 24th 1851

My Dear Cousin,
Perhaps you will be surprised to hear from me, for we never write to each other. I wish it could be otherwise, and if you will promise sometimes to write to me  I will undertake that the correspondence as far as I am concerned shall not soon terminate. You are the only relative on my Father's side and it is a pity we should not cultivate a closer intercourse. Perhaps you look up a me still as your junior but tho I am yet now we are both full grown men.
My dear Mother frequently mentions your party at St Day and we are always glad to hear of you.
We are now become quite Irish and our mild home is becoming natural to us. I think I have written to you since I have been here and told you about the place. Our house is close to the Atlantic and our Glebe lands are nearly 1500 acres so that we have quite a domain. Do you think you could come and see us- seriously if you could get away for 2 or 3 weeks and could come by way of Falmouth and Dublin you would not find the journey either tedious or expensive and we should be delighted to see you and would do all in our power to make you comfortable. Will you try. The journey would do you good and it would be a pleasure to see you.
I enclose a copy of a paper found among the papers of poor Cousin Susan at Liverpool. Can you tell us anything about it. Richard says that the writing of the original appears like the hand of your dear Father. I should be be very glad if you could tell me anything about our family for indeed I am very ignorant about them. Who is the Wilmot spoken of in the paper? Could you also tell me where our ancestors came from. I could never learn anything about them. I should like to know because my little ones will be removed away from their relations and I should like them to know all about their friends. It is not unlikely also from my position as Rector of an important parish that my boys, if spared, will receive a Collegiate education, and if there be any truth in the enclosed paper it is no harm that they should know it. I am sure dear Aunt will not mind the trouble of talking over old family matters and you will not mind spending a short time in writing to me about it.
We hope dear Aunt and your wife and children are well and that temporally and spiritually you are prospering. We have no reason to complain for we have many comforts, although attended with hard work in a parish 20 miles long.
Sarah joins me in kindest love and such and believe me then,
My dear cousin,
affectionately yours,
Fred Corfield

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Letter from Thomas John Tresidder Corfield (1816-1887) to his sons. This was  written the day before his second marriage.

London, July 6th 1855

My very dear Children,
I'm not going to write you a long letter as I've but a very few minutes to spare having an appointment in the City directly and the time is getting near and exactitude is the scheme of London life but I hope you would like a few lines from me from London.
I'm glad to hear from Uncle (unreadable) you are both well - very soon I hope to see you my dear little boys and until then I shall not have time to write again,
Believe me to be my dear Tom and Richard your most truly affectionate Father,
Thomas J. T. Corfield

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Letter from Mary Corfield (1843-1861) to her brother Thomas Corfield (1844-1885)

38 Southernhay    (Exeter)
February 11th 1859

My very dear Tom,
I was very sorry to hear that you are ill and I hope by the time you get this little note you will be quite well again. I suppose you did not expect a letter from me and indeed I had no thought of writing one until I received Mother's but I thought I would just enclose a tiny note as you were not quite well.
My dear Tom I wish I had some funny news to tell you but I have not heard or seen or done anything particular since I have been here. I must not forget to say that I told the girls in our room that you and the other boys just us in prison during the holidays and they laughed so at my story. We have had such dismal weather since I returned to school we have not had but one nice long walk. But on Thursday the sun shone so brightly in the morning it was such a heat. I was glad that Charles is well again I think he was disappointed at not being able to accompany us to Scerrier, I am sure I was. I am very busy now with my lessons and exercises so that I have very little time for writing. I shall tell Mother all about the concert I have been to, so you all hear about it from her.
I must now my dearest Tom say Good Bye and with fond love to all ever believe me,
your very loving
Sister

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Letter from Mary Corfield (1843-1861) to her brother Thomas Corfield (1844-1885)

38 Southernhay    (Exeter)
September 23rd

Dearest Tom,
I hope you will forgive my long delay in answering your kind letter. I really intended to write to you last Friday but had scarcely time to finish Mother's letter. I was very glad to find that you had not forgotten me, I shall hope to hear from you again before the half expires. Will you ask Charles to write to me soon I shall have had a note from all of you if he sends me one. I am not able to send you a (Unreadable) sheet of paper like Dick's was because his was the only one I had. How are your fish? Have you them still? And the rabbits too are they getting on well? I shall hardly feel at home when I return among so many new facts.
 I am informed that my Laffie has a kitten. I am thinking of giving it to Kate as the poor little (Unreadable) is the only one who has not a pet of her own. I have no news to tell you dear Tom but that Mr. Treffry sent me such a lovely basket of grapes a day or so ago. I wish you could have enjoyed them with me. I am sorry I cannot send you a longer note but am afraid that I shall scarcely have time to write to Mother. So goodbye my dearest Tom. Give my love to all at home and accept the same yourself from your loving
Sister.

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Letter from Mary Corfield (1843-1861) to her brother Thomas Corfield (1844-1885)

38 Southernhay    (Exeter)
Friday evening.

My very dear Tom,
I don't know what you will think of me for my long silence but now I have something to tell you. This afternoon we have heard a lecture in the school rooms and such a nice one I you wish you could have heard it. It was on electricity and he illustrated all his information and remarks by machinery which he had with him. I can now quite understand all about the Electric Telegraph and how it is worked at the stations (a thing I never did before) ( the gentleman who delivered the lecture I don't know his name) taught us several sentences he making the signs on the needles and we telling him what the letters were. Afterwards he showed how they printed a letter by Telegraph or rather by Electricity. I have sent you a little slip of paper which he printed, it is exactly the same as that which is used at the Stations. All the little dots and dashes are letters, so many dots and a dash for one and so many dashes and a dot for another. I cannot tell you now what letters they are but while he was printing them I could indeed and myself to make some and so did the smallest child in the school. It was done by means of a little instrument attached by some wires to the other machines placed in opposite parts of the table, but the little instrument was quite free and could be moved about as far as the wires would permit, just as Lady Friggles used to move about as far as her chain would permit, then you only need to tap this little thing to make the dots and keep it down for a little longer to make dashes.
You must let Dick and Charles call themselves part owners of this little slip of printed paper for it is quite a little curiosity. Dick in fact could well I think be interested in it. I have a lot more which I could tell you but I have not room. But I must not forget to tell you that Mr. Wellington (you see I have found out his name) converted my embroidery scissors into a magnet. I hope it will remain so but am rather afraid.
But now my dearest Brother I must thank you for your last letter and conclude
and believe me your very loving Sister
( I have never seen J Nicholl  but his school is I understand  a very nice one. One of the girls has a brother who goes there called Henry Bennett)

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Letter from Thomas John Tresidder Corfield (1816-1887) to his sons Richard and Thomas who were staying with their uncle and aunt in St Ives.

St Day. Dec 27th 1859

I was very glad to learn by your sisters letter that you were both very well & I hope very good, I have no doubt very happy and comfortable. I intended to have written you before but have been too busy to do so consistently. I should be glad to go down to see how you are getting on but shall not be able to leave until I fetch you home again and when Aunt T is tired of you she must lett (sic) so if her patience is exhausted before I may make up my mind & go down for you -  I hope Aunt received the key of the carpet bag soon after I left that she might not be inconvenienced for want of it, I'm sorry I should have forgotten it - but sent it on by a (Unreadable) from Trelyon. I enclose this in your sisters letter for your Kate & Charles & M Jewel send them love to you & will all be very glad to see you again - find my kindest love to Uncle & Aunt Tresidder to whom I feel grateful for the kindness in entertaining & I remain,
My dear Tom & Rich,
Yr affectionate father,
Thos J T Corfield

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Letter from Thomas John Tresidder Corfield (1816-1887) to his son Tom (1844-1885).

Thomas Corfield
Great Northern Hotel
London

St Day
Scorrier
October 9th 1862

My very dear Son Tom,
I was very glad to hear from you that you had arrived all safe and that you were happy and comfortable - of the latter I had no doubt and as Joe is so kind to you do not disregard his advice in moving about etc. in London, for all there is new to you and therefore you can have no experience of your own to guide you, so listen to those who can and will gladly inform you for your good - We did hope to have a letter from you as well as from Capt Joe. You must mind and write us next time if only that we may see your handwriting now that you are away from us - never mind if it must be a short letter we would rather receive that than none at all - Capt Joe can tell you what he said about the Bals - for past hour is nearly up - the Mozle Engine and Stamps were working yesterday - All join in kindest love to you - Believe me my dear Boy,
Your own truly affectionate Father,
Thomas J. T. Corfield

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Letter from Thomas John Tresidder Corfield (1816-1887)to his son Thomas Corfield (1844-1885)

St Day
Scorrier

Sunday Evening
October 12th 1862

My very dear Tom,
We were very greatly pleased to receive your very nice letter my son by this morning's post. Do write again soon. I am glad that you are comfortable and enjoying yourself and have no doubt you will greatly profit by your visit. It will give your ideas new and experience rich in many things that will be of value to you in after life if you make your observations with a view to solid information instead only of pleasures and enjoyment. I cannot write much now as I am much distressed at our dear little Marcia's illness. All else are getting on very well but she is very ill indeed. I have been obliged to give her wine this afternoon and evening to sustain her she is so reduced and so exceedingly weak and exhausted. I hope I may be able to say she is better tomorrow. Good bye and now my very dear boy,
Believe me
Your most truly affectionate Father,
Thomas J. T. Corfield

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Letter from Richard Corfield (1846-1875) to his brother Thomas (1844-1885)

St Day
October 14th 1862

Dear Tom,
I suppose you will be glad to hear something about the greenhouse and know whether the leaks are all stopped in the roof yet but I believe they are quite as bad as when you left. The masons were here yesterday and pointed up the wall inside and are here today cementing the sides and roof. I hope the shelves will be in their places against you get home again. Father is going to have wooden pegs to keep them in their places instead of notches in the cross-bars. The iron for ventilating is finished and the hooks put on.
I have done nothing to my etchings since you left but have been employing my time in putting slates around some parts of the garden.
I have received my things from the Polytechnic but have only gained a 10/6.
I believe I must now conclude this letter by asking you to tell me some things more about your travels and remain,
Your affectionate Brother,
Dick

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Letter from Richard Corfield to his brother Thomas.

Mr. Thos Corfield                                   
Great Northern Hotel
London

St Day
October 18th 1862

My Dear Tom,
I received your letter this morning with much pleasure but when I said the leaks were not all stopped I did not mean that it was painted inside. I am afraid the shelves will not be finished against you you get home because the timber was not bought before Thursday evening and it is not sent home yet and if it was it is quite new so that I should not be able to use it the sooner and it must take some time to dry. The masons broke two panes of glass in the roof but that is nothing to us because Nicholls said he would send up two panes for nothing.
We have had some bad weather these last two or three days much wind and rain it was so strong last Thursday night that it blew down your largest Souvenir de Chiswick fuchsia and broke a small shoot about 3 inches long but that has not hurt it there has been no accident to any of your plants since you left.
Father says you better go to see the Zoological Gardens and Hyde Park before you come home again.
Mother sends her love and says she quite intended to write you but she has not been able to find time but she should be very glad to receive a letter from you,
Believe me to be
Your very affectionate Brother
Richard

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